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Senior Reporter @News233

 

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The 2016 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos for his efforts to end his country's long-running civil war with FARC rebels.

The Nobel committee made the announcement in Oslo on Friday, five days after voters in Colombia narrowly rejected a peace deal
that Santos' government had spent years negotiating.
In its citation, the committee said it had awarded Santos the prize for "his resolute efforts to bring the country's more than 50-year-long civil war to an end, a war that has cost the lives of at least 220,000 Colombians and displaced close to six million people."
It added: "The award should also be seen as a tribute to the Colombian people who, despite great hardships and abuses, have not given up hope of a just peace, and to all the parties who have contributed to the peace process. This tribute is paid, not least, to the representatives of the countless victims of the civil war."
Santos' administration spent four years negotiating a deal with the former guerrilla group FARC that would have ended five decades of war.
The rejection of the deal by Colombians last weekend was a major blow for Santos, whose popularity has suffered over his support of the deal. Critics of the deal said it didn't do enough to punish the rebels.
Now it seems the rebels and the Colombian government, facilitated by international leaders, will have to go back to the drawing board to reimagine a peace that is acceptable to victims of murder, extortion and kidnapping.The Nobel Committee said the outcome "was not what President Santos wanted," but they acknowledged that he was "instrumental in ensuring that Colombian voters were able to voice their opinion concerning the peace accord in a referendum."

What next for the deal?

The ceasefire signed between the government and FARC rebels will expire at the end of October, Santos announced on Tuesday.
He has now tasked a three-person panel with reworking the deal.
"I hope that we can advance in our accords and dialogues so that we can settle on the arrangements, and the agreements that allow us to put in place a solution to this conflict," Santos said in a televised statement.
Born in Bogota in 1951, the former Navy cadet pursued degrees in Britain and America before returning to Colombia to work as a journalist.
In 2005 he helped found the Social Party of National Unity (Partido de la U), Colombia's largest political party.
Santos has been Colombia's president since 2010.
"Perfect peace is impossible, but a good peace, like the one we just negotiated, that's the best thing for every Colombian and for the world," Santos told CNN in August ahead of the referendum.
"Because always to have peace is much better to have war."

Pope Francis' call for mercy toward divorced Catholics arrived as "a breath of fresh air," Vince Frese says.

As a conservative Catholic, he's endured it all: married, divorced, secured an annulment and remarried.
For so long, the Catholic Church offered nothing to its divorced faithful such as Frese, who became a single parent after winning custody of his three daughters. Divorced parishioners felt excommunicated by the church, which has long disdained divorce. Many just went to another Christian denomination, but not Frese.
"They don't feel welcomed and they don't feel understood and they're hurting and they need help," Frese said. But the Pope on Friday spotlighted this "underserved" flock by issuing a sweeping statement instructing priests to be more welcoming to divorced catholics. The declaration promises a new era for Frese, 55, a software firm owner who lives with his family outside Atlanta. He and wife Monica,
who also went through a divorce with children and an annulment, now have seven children together.
"He's shining a light in this darkness, and that's a wonderful thing," Frese said. "The Pope is saying we need to help these people, and that's why ultimately I think it's going to help."

Don't 'pigeonhole' those who divorce

The Pope calls on pastors not to "pigeonhole" divorced Catholics but to use their own judgment about how to integrate them into the church.
Divorced Catholics, which Francis described as living in an "irregular situation," must be integrated into the church.
"The divorced who have entered a new union should be made to feel part of the Church," the pope wrote.
"Christian communities must not abandon divorced parents who have entered a new union."
Francis added: "It can no longer simply be said that all those living in any 'irregular situation' are living in a state of mortal sin."
The Pope also urged individual parishes to interpret doctrine in accordance with their community's culture.

'Everybody has a shot here'

Under church teaching, remarried Catholics without an annulment of the prior marriage are considered adulterers and cannot receive Holy Communion. 
The Rev. Edward Beck, a CNN religion commentator, interpreted Francis's new statement as providing a way to allow divorced and remarried Catholics to receive Holy Communion. Francis has already moved to make it easier to get an annulment.
 
"What he's saying is if you are divorced and you have remarried and haven't been able to get an annulment for some reason, that maybe for you, you can enter into this process, and communion can be possible," Beck said.
But the parishioners must speak with their pastor about the matter, Beck said.
"It is saying everybody has a shot here, but not everybody reaches it perfectly all at once," Beck said of the Pope's pronouncement.
The Rev. James Martin, a Jesuit priest and writer, called the Pope's paper a " groundbreaking new document" But Candida Moss, a theology professor at the University of Notre Dame, said "there were no bombshells" in the Pope's statement, which she described as "toothless, even if it is pastorally sensitive," she wrote.
ome Catholics took exception with the Pope.
"We can't make changes. It's not like it's a democratic thing, where Jesus gives us a vote," Phil Adargo, a Denver Catholic attending Mass on Friday evening".
It's been the same for 2,000 years."
Francis's statement is called an apostolic exhortation, in which a pope urges Catholics to behave in a particular way. Friday's statement is called 'On love in the family".
in English and "Amoris Laetitia" in Latin.
According to Georgetown University's Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate, of 30 million married Catholics in the United States, 4.5 million are divorced and remarried without an annulment.

'Let God work out the details'

For his part, Frese took the initiative to help divorced Catholics.
"Right now, on average, less than 15% of parishes have any support for divorced Catholics," Frese said.
The Pope is seeking to influence pastoral behavior without changing doctrine that he cannot change, Frese said.
"What he is trying to say is, 'Don't get all focused on the rules, let's be merciful to them and let God work out the details,' " he said.
 

Story highlights

  • "He's shining a light in this darkness, and that's a wonderful thing," a divorced Catholic says of Pope Francis
  • Francis urges priests to be more accepting of divorced Catholics
  • Pope is trying to influence pastoral behavior without changing doctrine, he says
 

(CNN)Pope Francis' call for mercy toward divorced Catholics arrived as "a breath of fresh air," Vince Frese says.

As a conservative Catholic, he's endured it all: married, divorced, secured an annulment and remarried.
For so long, the Catholic Church offered nothing to its divorced faithful such as Frese, who became a single parent after winning custody of his three daughters. Divorced parishioners felt excommunicated by the church, which has long disdained divorce. Many just went to another Christian denomination, but not Frese.
"They don't feel welcomed and they don't feel understood and they're hurting and they need help," Frese said.
Vince Frese appeared on his Twitter account beside wife Monica on their way to attend a retreat for divorced Catholics for the Diocese of Toledo.
 
But the Pope on Friday spotlighted this "underserved" flock by issuing a sweeping statement instructing priests to be more welcoming to divorced Catholics.
The declaration promises a new era for Frese, 55, a software firm owner who lives with his family outside Atlanta. He and wife Monica, who also went through a divorce with children and an annulment, now have seven children together.
"He's shining a light in this darkness, and that's a wonderful thing," Frese said. "The Pope is saying we need to help these people, and that's why ultimately I think it's going to help."

Don't 'pigeonhole' those who divorce

The Pope calls on pastors not to "pigeonhole" divorced Catholics but to use their own judgment about how to integrate them into the church.
 
 
Divorced Catholics, which Francis described as living in an "irregular situation," must be integrated into the church.
"The divorced who have entered a new union should be made to feel part of the Church," the Pope wrote. "Christian communities must not abandon divorced parents who have entered a new union."
Francis added: "It can no longer simply be said that all those living in any 'irregular situation' are living in a state of mortal sin."
The Pope also urged individual parishes to interpret doctrine in accordance with their community's culture.

'Everybody has a shot here'

Under church teaching, remarried Catholics without an annulment of the prior marriage are considered adulterers and cannot receive Holy Communion.
The Rev. Edward Beck, a CNN religion commentator, interpreted Francis's new statement as providing a way to allow divorced and remarried Catholics to receive Holy Communion. Francis has already moved to make it easier to get an annulment.
 
Divorced Catholics praise Pope's views on modern family
 
 
 
 
Divorced Catholics praise Pope's views on modern family 02:17
"What he's saying is if you are divorced and you have remarried and haven't been able to get an annulment for some reason, that maybe for you, you can enter into this process, and communion can be possible," Beck said.
But the parishioners must speak with their pastor about the matter, Beck said.
"It is saying everybody has a shot here, but not everybody reaches it perfectly all at once," Beck said of the Pope's pronouncement.
The Rev. James Martin, a Jesuit priest and writer, called the Pope's paper a "groundbreaking new document."
But Candida Moss, a theology professor at the University of Notre Dame, said "there were no bombshells" in the Pope's statement, which she described as "toothless, even if it is pastorally sensitive," she wrote for CNN Opinion.
Some Catholics took exception with the Pope.
"We can't make changes. It's not like it's a democratic thing, where Jesus gives us a vote," Phil Adargo, a Denver Catholic attending Mass on Friday evening, told CNN affiliate KMGH. "It's been the same for 2,000 years."
Francis's statement is called an apostolic exhortation, in which a pope urges Catholics to behave in a particular way. Friday's statement is called "On Love in the Family" in English and "Amoris Laetitia" in Latin.
According to Georgetown University's Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate, of 30 million married Catholics in the United States, 4.5 million are divorced and remarried without an annulment.

'Let God work out the details'

For his part, Frese took the initiative to help divorced Catholics.
He developed a program to help them heal, now writes a blog at VinceFrese.com, founded a divorced Catholic ministry at his parish, and co-wrote the book "Divorced. Catholic. Now What?"
Vince Frese speaks to divorced Catholics at a retreat held by the Diocese of Toledo.
 
"Right now, on average, less than 15% of parishes have any support for divorced Catholics," Frese said.
The Pope is seeking to influence pastoral behavior without changing doctrine that he cannot change, Frese said.
"What he is trying to say is, 'Don't get all focused on the rules, let's be merciful to them and let God work out the details,' " he said.
About a quarter of American Catholics have experienced divorce, according to the Pew Research Center, a think tank in Washington. That's slightly lower than the national average of 30% as of last year.

Sitting in the back row

Other Catholics also found hope in the Pope's declaration.
Annette was 31, living more than 6,000 miles from home with three young children, when she decided she had to leave her husband.
"I experienced great violence and the doctors asked me how many times they were going to have to patch me up," she recalled Friday, nearly 50 years later.
Back home in Glasgow, Scotland, as a single mother in the late 1960s, she had difficulty supporting herself, getting a mortgage -- and going to church.
"All I did really was confuse the community," she said. "It would have been easier for them to accept me as the mother of three illegitimate children than as the divorced mother of three children."
She doubts the bishops in her day had "true understanding of what human relationships were," accusing them of "draconian" decisions, she said.
Today, she hopes that era is relegated to bygones under Francis's new announcement, she said.
Annette, now 80, never had her marriage annulled, but she attends church and participates in confession and Holy Communion.
 
She doesn't know whether her priest is aware that she's divorced.
"I don't care anymore," she said with a laugh.
But she said she hopes the Pope's statement will help others.
"I have been in touch with over 400 divorced Catholics. Many have accepted that the church has nothing more to say to them. Many sit in the back rows of their churches, contritely, for some reason," she said.
Neither option is good enough, she said.
"If someone is looking for ... a community of welcome and comfort and understanding, it shouldn't be an exclusive community," she said. "None of us are perfect. Even bishops."

President Barack Obama made an impassioned plea Tuesday for countries to fulfill a moral obligation to alleviate a global refugee crisis "of epic proportions," despite a political backlash in the US against absorbing those fleeing Middle East violence.

The President's interest in calling attention to the tens of millions of displaced people around the world, and pushing back against the anti-refugee tenor, was underscored by his decision to convene a Leaders' Summit on Refugees at the United Nations Tuesday.
At the summit, he also rejected another aspect of the American political debate swirling around accepting foreigners -- GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump's call to build a wall along the US-Mexico border.
"This crisis is a test of our common humanity. Whether we give into suspicion and fear and build walls, or whether we see ourselves in another," Obama said, though he didn't mention Trump by name.
Obama singled out the situation in Syria, which has displaced 4.8 million people so far, as particularly "unacceptable."
"We are not as unified as we should be in pushing to make it stop," he said, describing the global refugee crisis as both a humanitarian and security challenge that tests countries' ability to take collective action.
"I called this summit because this crisis is one of the most urgent tests of our time," he said. "Just as failure to act in the past -- for example, by turning away Jews fleeing Nazi Germany -- is a stain on our collective conscience, I believe history will judge us harshly if we do not rise to this moment."
The refugee issue is one that's captured the world's attention more in the past two years than at perhaps any time since World War II, seared into the public's consciousness by photos like that of a 3-year-old Syrian boy who drowned in the Mediterranean and the flood of migrants into Europe.
A recent study from the UN Refugee agency estimated 65.3 million people were displaced from their homes by conflict or persecution in 2015, up by over five million from the prior year. Many are internally displaced within the borders of their own countries, but about 21.3 million are classified as refugees.
Obama's summit follows a similar UN-led meeting on the issue Monday, which drew attention to the crisis but offered little in the way of binding commitments.
"Make no mistake," US Secretary of State John Kerry said at the UN meeting, "additional efforts are urgently needed."
Leaders also called for a more orderly and equitable system to manage refugee flows -- acknowledging the burden is shouldered disproportionally by certain regions.
"You have to know that today the European Union has a clear objective to restore order on its external borders," European Council President Donald Tusk said in his remarks, signaling a growing sense that patience in Europe with the migrant flow is wearing thin.
"There will be no repeat of the year 2015 with more than one and a half million irregular migrants," he added.
The Obama administration is hopeful the Leader's Summit on Tuesday afternoon can build momentum for more action.
National Security Advisor Susan Rice in June announced that the gathering -- co-hosted along with the US by Canada, Ethiopia, Germany, Jordan, Mexico, Sweden and the UN Secretary General -- would seek an increase in funding of at least 30%, a doubling of permanent resettlement, and expanded access to education and work rights for refugees.
"Reaching these ambitious objectives will be challenging, yet the level of need demands no less," Rice said in a statement.
But aid groups are skeptical the summit will prompt the kind of action they say is desperately needed.
"We have to be optimistic that we'll see some real concrete commitments," said Amnesty International's Interim Executive Director Margaret Huang. "But the truth is, even if those numbers are hit, it's nowhere near what's actually needed."
The US is a major contributor of humanitarian aid for countries that host large numbers of refugees -- particularly Syria's neighbors -- and plans to increase the number of refugees it will take in to America from 85,000 in 2016 to 110,000 next year.
The President's chief spokesman last week conceded that even as the administration calls for greater global action, it is limited in what it can do.
"The President's commitment to ensuring that the United States plays a leading role on this issue is not shared by a lot of people in Congress, including by a lot of people in the Republican majority in Congress," Press Secretary Josh Earnest told reporters. "And that has an impact in terms of the resources that are dedicated to this effort."
Vetting efforts to screen refugees, he noted, "are not cheap."
David Miliband, president of the International Rescue Committee and a former British Foreign Secretary, said he's hopeful but waiting to see whether any agreements are backed up with action.
"The scale of the global refugee problem demands an appropriate scale of response," Miliband told CNN. "Governments around the world haven't, in the main, been responding with the right degree of compassion or competence up to now."
But the co-hosts of the Leaders' Summit said in a statement they were pleased with "new and significant humanitarian contributions" from world leaders.
"We sought a $3 billion increase in global humanitarian financing and commitments to maintain funding in future years," they said. "Through our mutual efforts, over the course of 2016, the 32 donors participating today have contributed this year roughly 4.5 billion additional dollars to UN appeals and international humanitarian organizations than in 2015."
Friday, 07 October 2016 12:11

Mariah Carey hits high notes on 'Empire'

Mariah Carey's loyal 'lambs' got to see her collaborate with a Lyon on "Empire" Wednesday night.

In the episode, the legendary singer, naturally, played a legendary singer named was Kitty.
She was brought into the Lyons' orbit when Cookie (Taraji P. Henson) recruited her for a duet with a spiraling Jamal (Jussie Smollett), who is still struggling with post-traumatic stress stemming from a shooting that left him injured and addicted to pain pills.
At first Jamal turned down the opportunity to duet with Kitty and almost flamed out once he actually got into the studio. Luckily, he was able to pull it together to produce a song best described by a series of flame emoji.
Carey appeared in only two scenes in the episode, but she still found a way to stay on brand. An example: Carey wore a leotard and tights for her on-screen studio session.
Fans had been anticipating Carey's appearance on "Empire" for a long time now. Fox officially announced her guest spot in August but creator Lee Daniels had been pursuing the songstress for about a year.

It's unclear when E!'s cameras will once again be keeping up with the Kardashians.

Production on the E! network's reality hit starring the Kardashian family remains on hold days after star Kim Kardashian West was robbed of over $10 million worth of jewelry while in Paris.
"Kim's well-being is our core focus right now. No decision has been made as to when production will resume," an E! spokesperson told CNN. On October 3, Kardashian West was robbed at gunpoint by a group of men who stormed the private apartment where she was staying.
The star, who was restrained in the bathtub during the incident, was physically unharmed but left shaken, according to her representative. Kardashian West was in France with some of her sisters for Paris Fashion Week, but no other members of the family were with her at the time of the break in.
Following the robbery, Kardashian West returned to the United States and was joined by husband Kanye West.
The robbery occurred just weeks before the second half of "Keeping Up with the Kardashians" Season 12 is set to air. It's not been said if or how the episode, airing October 23, will address the incident.
"Keeping Up with the Kardashians" has aired on the E! network since 2007.
The show turned sisters Kim Kardashian, Kourtney Kardashian, Khloe Kardashian, Kendall Jenner and Kylie Jenner into social media superstars and tabloid headline makers.
Led by the efforts of their mother and manager Kris Jenner, the sisters turned their buzz into business, lending their names to a clothing line, makeup products and a mobile game. They also scored multiple endorsements.
E! also benefitted from its early relationship with the family. "Keeping Up with the Kardashians" spawned six spin-off series, including "Rob & Chyna," starring sole Kardashian brother Rob and fiancée Blac Chyna.
"Rob & Chyna" currently airs on Sundays.
 

France's highest administrative  court is being asked to overturn beach bans imposed by 26 towns on women in full-body swimsuits known as "burkinis".

A human rights group and an anti-Islamophobia association argue the bans are in breach of French law.

Mayors, particularly on the Riviera, say the bans are protecting public order and rules on secularism.

Opinion polls suggest most French people back the bans but Muslims warn they are being targeted unfairly. 64% of French people are in favour of the bans while another 30% are indifferent.

The bans appeared to have split senior members of the French government.

Prime Minister Manuel Valls waded into the debate on Thursday, backing the mayors who had made public order decisions in the aftermath of the jihadist attack on Nice last month. The burkini represented the "enslavement of women", he added.

Education Minister Najat Vallaud-Belkacem said that while she disapproved of the burkini as a feminist, she saw the bans as unwelcome and objected to the idea that the clothing a woman wore on a beach could have any link to terrorism or jihadist group Islamic State. The controversy has intensified in France after pictures of police appearing to enforce the ban prompted widespread anger, Some of the women pictured in Nice and Cannes were not wearing burins. Siam, 34, a mother from Toulouse, was fined €11 (£9, $12), although she insists she was not wearing a burkini at the time but leggings, a jacket and a headscarf.

"The policeman told me I had to wear correct clothing and wear the hijab as a headband. But I left the beach and kept my hijab on,"

 felt like a stranger in my own country. Some people came to comfort me but others insulted me.” Anouar Kbibech, president of the French Council of the Muslim Faith (CFCM), said he was "concerned over the direction the public debate is taking", citing the "growing fear of stigmatisation of Muslims in France".

Most of the beaches where bans have been imposed are on the Riviera in south-east France.

However, few are thought to have issued fines other than the authorities at Cannes and Nice, where more than 20 fines have been handed out.

France's Human Rights League (LDH) and the anti-Islamophobia association (CCIF) argue the bans contravene freedom of opinion, religion, clothing and movement. They failed to persuade a court in Nice this week to overturn a ban at Villeneuve-Loubet west of Nice and have taken their case to France's highest administrative court, the Council of State (Conseil d'Etat). A ruling is expected on Friday afternoon.

Why have the bans been imposed?

After a militant Islamist ploughed a lorry into families on the seafront at Nice on 14 July, killing 86 people, the city's authorities said a ban  was "a necessity".

Local leaders have described their actions as appropriate and proportionate. But the bans are not just a response to a spate of deadly jihadist attacks on French soil. France has long-standing laws on secularism, and the Nice ban focused on "correct dress, respectful of accepted customs and secularism, as well as rules of hygiene and of safety in public bathing areas".

The Council of State is expected to take 48 hours to deliver its verdict, but the interior minister has said there is nothing to stop mayors taking action, as long as it is "rigorously proportionate”.

What French law says on secularism and religious clothing

In 2010, France became the first European country to ban the full-face veil in public
A 2004 law forbids the wearing of religious emblems in schools and colleges
The 1905 constitution aims to separate Church and state. It enshrines secularism in education but also guarantees the freedom of religion and freedom to exercise it. The original text made no reference to clothing.
"Access to beaches and for swimming is banned to any person wearing improper clothes that are not respectful of accepted customs and secularism"
"Beachwear which ostentatiously displays religious affiliation, when France and places of worship are currently the target of terrorist attacks, is liable to create risks of disrupting public order"
The infringement is punishable with a fine of €38 (£33)
The ban remains in place until 31 August 2016
 

The death toll in the Italian earthquake stands at 241 as rescuers continue efforts to find survivors.

Dozens of people are believed trapped in ruined Amatrice, Accumoli and Pescara del Tronto, in mountainous central Italy.

There have been hundreds of aftershocks since the quake struck, hampering relief efforts and damaging already unstable buildings.

More than 4,300 rescuers are using heavy machinery and their bare hands.

Rescuers have advised journalists and bystanders to leave Amatrice urgently, as "the town is crumbling", the BBC's Jenny Hill says.

Another powerful aftershock struck the town on Thursday afternoon, sending a huge dust cloud into the air. Many of the earthquake's victims were children, the health minister said, and there were warnings the toll could rise further.

The heaviest death toll was in Amatrice - 184, officials said. Another 46 died in Arquata, and 11 in Accumoli. A further 264 people have been treated in hospital.

Officials revised down the number of dead after earlier giving a figure of 247. The 6.2-magnitude quake hit at 03:36 (01:36 GMT) on Wednesday 100km (65 miles) north-east of Rome.

"We are sleeping in the car and there were shocks all night. When the biggest one came, the car started moving and shaking," said Monica, a survivor from Amatrice.


At the scene: BBC's Damian Grammaticas in Pescara del Tronto

Two firemen burrowed deep into the rubble looking for a survivor. "It's a dog," one of them shouted out.

For half an hour the men kept digging. They passed water down to be given to the animal. And eventually they worked it free, then emerged, carrying it to the surface. There was a ripple of congratulations through the crowd.

"It doesn't matter to us if it's a person or an animal, we save it," said Gianni Macerata, the fire officer in charge.

So the digging goes on. But so little is left of Pescara del Tronto it is unlikely that more survivors will be found here.

It seems unlikely too that this ancient little place, that has stood for centuries, can ever be rebuilt. Hundreds of years of history ended in an instant. A tented camp has been set up, as so many buildings are now unsafe.

Prime Minister Matteo Renzi was chairing an emergency cabinet meeting on Thursday. The agenda included reconstruction plans for the devastated area. Rescuers said they had pulled five bodies from the ruins of the Hotel Roma in Amatrice. As many as 70 tourists were staying at the hotel when the quake struck. Many are feared to be in the rubble, though several were pulled out and given medical care.

Many of those affected were Italians on holiday in the region. Some were in Amatrice for a festival to celebrate a famous local speciality - amatriciana bacon and tomato sauce.

Late on Wednesday there were cheers in the village of Pescara del Tronto when a young girl was pulled alive from the rubble  after being trapped for 17 hours. Almost all the houses there had collapsed, the mayor said.


Why is Italy at risk of earthquakes? By Jonathan Amos

Earthquakes are an ever-present danger for those who live along the Apennine mountain range in Italy.

Through the centuries thousands have died as a result of tremors equal to, or not much bigger than, the event that struck in the early hours of Wednesday. The modern response, thankfully, has been more robust building and better preparation. Mediterranean seismicity is driven by the great collision between the African and Eurasian tectonic plates; but when it comes down to the specifics of this latest quake, the details are far more complicated.

The Tyrrhenian Basin, or Sea, which lies to the west of Italy, between the mainland and Sardinia/Corsica, is slowly opening up.

Scientists say this is contributing to extension, or "pull-apart", along the Apennines. This stress is compounded by movement in the east, in the Adriatic.

The result is a major fault system that runs the length of the mountain range with a series of smaller faults that fan off to the sides. The foundations of cities like Perugia and L'Aquila stand on top of it all.

 

 

 

Manchester City have signed goalkeeper Claudio Bravo from Barcelona for 18m euros (£15.4m).

The fee for the 33-year-old Chile international could rise with £1.7m of add-ons, say the Spanish club.

Bravo, who has signed a four-year contract, is expected to start ahead of England goalkeeper Joe Hart and Argentine Willy Caballero.

Barca have replaced Bravo with Netherlands international Jasper Cillessen from Ajax

Bravo said: "I'm very proud to be joining Manchester City.

"I know the club is building something very special and I hope I can be part of many successes in the coming years."

Bravo joined Barcelona in 2014 and won two La Liga titles and the Fifa Club World Cup.

He was also part of the Champions League-winning squad in 2015, but never played in the competition for Barca.

"It is not easy to leave a club like Barcelona where I had two fantastic years, but the opportunity to work with Pep Guardiola was too good to refuse," he added. Guardiola, who became City manager in the summer, said: "Claudio is a fantastic goalkeeper and an excellent addition to our squad.

"He has experience and great leadership qualities and is in the prime of his life. He is a goalkeeper I have admired for a number of years and I'm really happy he is now a City player."

Guardiola has signed Bravo as he has major reservations about Hart's ability to play as the kind of 'sweeper-keeper' his preferred system demands.

Hart, 29, was dropped by Guardiola for the first three games of the season but was made captain for their Champions League play-off win against Steaua Bucharest, keeping a clean sheet in his first start of the season.

It was expected Hart would leave the club before the transfer window closes on 31 August, but an immediate transfer is no longer certain.

He does not want to move to Sevilla or Borussia Dortmund, both of whom are reported to be interested in signing him.

Everton seemed a potential destination late last week but manager Ronald Koeman has said he has no interest in signing Hart.

England manager Sam Allardyce has said Hart's situation is "a concern" but that he would pick the player in his squad for the World Cup qualifier against Slovakia on 4 September.

Students of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology were left stunned after images of some students being canned by their lecturer in class went viral on social media.

The lecturer, whose name is Dr. Owusu at the Department of Agriculture Economics Agribusiness & Extension subjected the dozens of students to receiving strokes of the cane after they failed to report to the class with statistical tables in spite of an earlier warning.

The photos showed the students; males and females lined up in a queue to each receive their strokes.

Social commentators have expressed varied opinion over the incident as school authorities are silent over the issue.

The anger in the leader and founder of the International Godsway Church, Bishop Daniel Obinim could be hardly faded out as he continues to voice out new displeasures about the negativities people say about him day in and day out.

The 'Aboroso' man of God has recently accused Rev Sam Korankye Ankrah of the Royal House Chapel of fornication.

According to Angel Obinim who was on OB TV this weekend, before he was coming on the show that night, he entered in the spiritual realm and God revealed to him that Rev Sam Korankye Ankrah has been fornicating with members of his church, citing three instances.

He further revealed that through the revelation, he got to know that Rev Sam Ankra is a gay.

This follows a recent statement by Rev Sam Korankye Ankra that Angel Obinim is a magician and not a man of God as he calls himself. He also stated that Bishop Obinim is tarnishing the image of God with his magical powers.

Rev Sam's claims was in relation to Bishop Obinim saying that he is able to turn into any creature to visit people in their dreams.

He has also thrown a challenge to all pastors, Imams, fetish priests, spiritualists, etc, to face him for a spiritual battle to prove to the world that he is indeed a man of God.

His wife, Mrs. Florence Obinim has within the week come out to support his husband saying what Bishop said is right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Ghanaweb

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